Iskina Cebu – Lechon in Singapore

I had this insatiable craving for lechon, or roasted pig.  Lechon is a Filipino dish that came from the Spanish influence in my country.  The pig’s innards are discarded and herbs and spices are placed inside the pig before the entire pig is roasted over an open flame.

I have been looking for a good lechon place here in Singapore and I think I found one that I’ll come back to one of these days.

The place is called Iskina Cebu.  The lechon is of the Cebu style of cooking lechon which is believed to be the best type of lechon in the Philippines.

Iskina Cebu is located at Paya Lebar right across the Paya Lebar MRT.  The exact address is:

Geylang East Industrial Estate, 1016 Geylang East Avenue 3 389731

Unfortunately, when I arrived there around 1pm, they have already ran out of their original Cebu lechon.  Only the spicy kind was left.  Since I didn’t want the day to be a waste I decided to try the spicy Cebu lechon.  It was S$10 worth.

Iskana Cebu Spicy Lechone Meal - S$10

Iskina Cebu Spicy Lechon Meal – S$10

I loved the taste of it.  In fact, I liked it more than the lechon I tasted from Zubuchon and CBT in Cebu.  The pig’s skin was crispy and so tasty.  The serving was also well worth the S$10 I gave for a meal in a hawker.

The only complaint I had was that the part of the pig I got was a bit too fatty.  After a few mins my plate was oily.  If you are watching your weight that is a big NO NO.  But I told myself, sometimes you just have to enjoy life and risk life at the same time – so what the heck I won’t eat it everyday anyway.

I highly recommend Iskina Cebu not only to my fellow countrymen but to Singaporeans and other expats in Singapore who love pork.  It’s cheaper than going back to the Philippines just to get a taste of lechon – one of the Pinoy delicacies that Anthony Bourdain loved.

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7.2 Earthquake in the Philippines

Last Tuesday, October 15, 2013, a 7.2 earthquake rocked the Visayas region of the Philippines.  The main areas hit by the quake are Cebu and Bohol.

A friend of mine recently posted a blog about what she felt about this tragedy especially since she just came from Bohol for a vacation.

I can relate with her because of this video.

This video shows the Basilica Del Sto. Nino and the partial collapse of its belfry.  Earlier this year I went to Cebu and was lucky enough to see this church and its interiors.  It’s right beside the Magellan’s Cross which I posted here in my site a couple of month’s ago.

It’s sad to see these old churches and historical sites collapse or get damaged but in all honesty there is very little that humans can do.  I read somewhere that a 7.2 earthquake is roughly equivalent to 32 Hiroshima bombs.  What are the chances of an old building like this have against that immense power?  If mother nature wants to claim back what is hers she can.

I just hope that one day the people of Cebu and the other affected areas can stand up again like what Filipinos normally do.  We always get up no matter how big the challenge is.  Also, I hope that they can rebuild or fix the damaged parts of the historic sites – yes it will no longer be authentic but at least it will be available for other generations to see and experience.